21st Century Transportation for Colorado

CONNECTING COLORADO—CoPIRG is working to ensure the completion of the Metro-Denver FasTracks system, and is fighting for alternative transportation solutions like high-speed rail along the Front Range, passenger rail along I-70 to the ski slopes and rapid bus connectivity everywhere in between.

GIVING COLORADANS TRANSIT OPTIONS

Our current transportation system has many of us stuck on crumbling roads and bridges endlessly waiting in traffic, all the while spewing air pollution and consuming billions of barrels of overseas oil.

Light rail, clean bus systems, and other public transit should play a greater part in Colorado's transportation future. Efficient public transportation systems reduce the number of cars on the road and increase our options for getting around.

We’re working for more and better transit by encouraging public support for new projects and improved service, like the completion of the metro Denver FasTracks light-rail system, and the construction of passenger rail along I-70.

Sign up for our email list to stay up to date on CoPIRG's campaign to bring 21st century transportation options to Colorado.

TRANSPORTATION SOLUTIONS FOR COLORADO

  • FasTracks: Back in 2004, Denver-area voters approved a 4-cent sales tax to construct a nine-spoke light rail system to reduce traffic congestion and provide alternative ways to travel around the metro area. Unfortunately, the economic downturn has created a shortfall for the project funding, and construction on several of the lines has fallen behind. So CoPIRG is working to secure full funding to complete this important project.
  • I-70 Rail: I-70 is a critical artery for our state, whether it’s the goods coming from the West Coast or the skiers and hikers coming from the Front Range. Unfortunately, it’s choked with traffic and worn down. Fixing I-70 will be extremely costly, but ignoring it is not an option. The Colorado Department of Transportation has announced they are taking a critical step to  pursue the comprehensive solution of both upgrading the safety of sections of the road while also investing in rail options that get people out of their cars.  But there are many more hurdles to overcome before this becomes a reality. 

CoPIRG will continue our campaign, with grassroots support from Coloradans like you, to move forward passenger rail options along I-70.

Issue updates

Media Hit | Transportation

Last piece of U.S. 36 contract put in place Thursday

The final piece of an agreement that hands over the maintenance and tolling of U.S. 36 between Boulder and Denver for 50 years was quietly put in place Thursday.

> Keep Reading
News Release | CoPIRG | Transportation

Despite Call to Slow Down, US36 Deal Approved

Despite calls from CoPIRG and others for a public input period before approving a 50-year agreement with a private company to build and manage parts of US36, the Board of the High-Performance Transportation Enterprise (HPTE) approved the deal at their regularly scheduled meeting today. The approval comes at a time when public confusion remains high about a deal that would have Plenary Roads Denver build and maintain parts of US36 that connect Boulder to Denver and manage tolls on two new lanes extending from Boulder to Denver.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Transportation

CoPIRG Calls For Review Period On U.S. 36 Contract

In response to growing public criticism over a U.S. 36 maintenance project contract, the Colorado Public Interest Research Group is asking for an extended review period.

CoPIRG director Danny Katz says a  20- or 30-day public input period would benefit both the public and the Colorado Department of Transportation.

> Keep Reading
Blog Post | Transportation

Questions we should ask about US 36 agreement | Danny Katz

There are three things people should review around the US 36 proposal - Is this a good transportation project? Should we engage in a public-private partnership to complete it? Has this been a good process?

This post is mainly about # 2, the 600 page agreement between CDOT and a private company to manage US 36 for the next 50 years.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Transportation

Officials Release US 36 Contract

The Colorado Department of Transportation has released its much-criticized contract with a private firm to operate U.S. 36 between Denver and Boulder for the next 50 years. The contract was posted Friday on CDOT's website. It wasn't previously available to the public.

> Keep Reading

Pages

News Release | CoPIRG | Transportation

Despite Call to Slow Down, US36 Deal Approved

Despite calls from CoPIRG and others for a public input period before approving a 50-year agreement with a private company to build and manage parts of US36, the Board of the High-Performance Transportation Enterprise (HPTE) approved the deal at their regularly scheduled meeting today. The approval comes at a time when public confusion remains high about a deal that would have Plenary Roads Denver build and maintain parts of US36 that connect Boulder to Denver and manage tolls on two new lanes extending from Boulder to Denver.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Transportation

CoPIRG Calls For Review Period On U.S. 36 Contract

In response to growing public criticism over a U.S. 36 maintenance project contract, the Colorado Public Interest Research Group is asking for an extended review period.

CoPIRG director Danny Katz says a  20- or 30-day public input period would benefit both the public and the Colorado Department of Transportation.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Transportation

Officials Release US 36 Contract

The Colorado Department of Transportation has released its much-criticized contract with a private firm to operate U.S. 36 between Denver and Boulder for the next 50 years. The contract was posted Friday on CDOT's website. It wasn't previously available to the public.

> Keep Reading
Media Hit | Transportation

CDOT releases 600-page U.S. 36 management contract for public review

A controversial pact between the state and a private firm hired to manage and collect tolls along U.S. 36 between Denver and Boulder was released to a skeptical public Friday afternoon.

> Keep Reading
News Release | CoPIRG | Transportation

CoPIRG Releases Principles for Privatized Transportation Projects

As Colorado’s transportation officials pursue more and more “public-private partnerships” (PPPs) to help build and maintain roads and transit projects, CoPIRG released a set of principles that the public can use to determine if projects adequately protect the public interest. CoPIRG released the principles the week the Colorado Department of Transportation (CDOT) is holding public information sessions on a proposed PPP to build and maintain highway US 36.

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Pages

Report | CoPIRG | Transportation

New Direction

The Driving Boom—a six decade-long period of steady increases in per-capita driving in the United States—is over. This report reveals why and what the implications are.

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Report | CoPIRG | Transportation

Transportation and the New Generation

From World War II until just a few years ago, the number of miles driven annually on America’s roads steadily increased. Then, at the turn of the century, something changed: Americans began driving less. By 2011, the average American was driving 6 percent fewer miles per year than in 2004. The trend away from driving has been led by young people.

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Report | CoPIRG | Budget, Tax, Transportation

Do Roads Pay for Themselves?

Highways do not – and, except for brief periods in our nation’s history, never have – paid for themselves through the taxes that highway advocates label “user fees.” Yet highway advocates continue to suggest they do in an attempt to secure preferential access to scarce public resources and to shape how those resources are spent.

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Report | CoPIRG | Transportation

Transportation Freedom Day 2010

To highlight the differences in transportation costs per city, CoPIRG released data from the Center of Neighborhood Technology that calculated each city’s Transportation Freedom Day - the date in which a typical household has earned enough to cover its annual transportation costs. That day tends to arrive earlier for residents of cities with more car-alternatives to getting around.

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Report | CoPIRG | Transportation

Colorado's Transportation Crossroads

Colorado’s transportation network does a poor job of meeting the needs of the state’s residents.

Expanding public transportation can provide more Coloradans with alternatives to driving, while laying the foundation for an efficient transportation system for the 21st century.

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